Analysis of excitability and connectivity cortical for a neurorehabilitation system based on brain machine interface and robotic monocycle.

Name: Vivianne Flávia Cardoso
Type: PhD thesis
Publication date: 29/06/2021
Advisor:

Namesort descending Role
Teodiano Freire Bastos Filho Advisor *

Examining board:

Namesort descending Role
Anselmo Frizera Neto Co advisor *
Breno Valentim Nogueira Internal Examiner *
Denis Delisle Rodriguez External Examiner *
Eliete Maria de Oliveira Caldeira Internal Examiner *
Marco Cesar Cunegundes Guimarães Internal Alternate *
Teodiano Freire Bastos Filho Advisor *

Summary: CARDOSO V.F. 2021. 110f. Analysis of excitability and connectivity cortical for a neurorehabilitation system based on brain machine interface and robotic monocycle. 2021. 121f. Thesis (doctoral in biotechnology)- Postgraduation Biotechnological Program, UFES, Espirito Santo. Brazil.

Recently, studies on cycling-based brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) have been standing out due to their potential for lower-limb recovery. In this scenario, the behavior of the sensory motor rhythms and the brain connectivity presents themselves as source of information that can contribute to interpret the cortical effect of these technologies. This study aims to analyze how motor sensory rhythms and the cortical connectivity behave when volunteers command a reactive motor imagery (MI) BCI that provides passive pedaling feedback. Eight healthy subjects performed pedaling MI to command an Electroencephalography (EEG) based BCI with motorized pedal to receive passive movements as feedback. The EEG data were analyzed under the following four conditions: resting, MI calibration, MI online and receiving passive pedaling (online phase). Most subjects produced over the foot area (around Cz) significant event-related desynchronization (ERD) patterns over the foot area (around Cz) when performing MI and receiving passive pedaling. The sharpest decrease was found for low β band. The connectivity results revealed an exchange of information between supplementary motor area (SMA) and parietal regions during MI and passive pedaling. Findings point the primary motor cortex activation for most participants and the connectivity between SMA and parietal regions during pedaling MI and passive pedaling.
Keywords: Brain-Computer Interface. Brain Connectivity. Lower Limbs Rehabilitation. Motor Sensory Rhythms. Pedaling.

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